Hubbard Fellowship Blog- Crane Commuters & Seed Stragglers

This post was written by Evan Barrientos, one of our Hubbard Fellows.  Evan is a talented writer and photographer and I encourage you to check out his personal blog. If you would like to see more of his photographs, you can follow him on Facebook.

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I’m finally experiencing the much-extolled Nebraskan crane migration. Each morning, as if fleeing from the rising sun, thousands of Sandhill Cranes noisily fly west over my house as they leave their nighttime roosts on the Platte River. Throughout the day their trumpeting calls are a constant presence, and a welcome one after a winter where wind was the main sound. At sunset the cranes infallibly return from the cornfields, heading east towards the Platte. It’s a routine I’m really enjoying and trying to photograph as often and in as many ways as possible. Crane migration is so popular that many photos have become cliché, so I’m trying to put my own spin on it.

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When I pull my eyes away from the sky and look at the ground, I notice how worn the old seedheads are, so ready to fade away. Most seeds have finally dropped but a few remain, as if waiting to be absolutely sure that the winter is over before leaving their cozy shelters. Yesterday, with thin clouds creating excellent light for photography, I spent about an hour using my macro lens to highlight the surprising patterns and colors in these intricate little formations. It won’t be long before I can start photographing living plants again!

Illinois Bundleflower (Desmathus illinoensis)

Illinois Bundleflower (Desmathus illinoensis)

Stiff Sunflower (Helianthus pauciflorus)

Stiff Sunflower (Helianthus pauciflorus)

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About Evan Barrientos

Evan is a conservationist, naturalist, and photographer, and is currently the monitoring and outreach assistant for the The Nature Conservancy in Oregon. He has a passion for sharing nature with others through environmental education, multimedia, and blogging at www.natlens.wordpress.com.
This entry was posted in Hubbard Fellowship, Prairie Animals, Prairie Plants and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Hubbard Fellowship Blog- Crane Commuters & Seed Stragglers

  1. Paul says:

    Excellent photography Evan! Thanks so much for sharing these. Always interesting to get out and look around as winter ends and spring begins.

  2. Denise Westlake says:

    Omgosh!!

    Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

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