A Seedy Survey

Are you involved in grassland restoration work in North America?  If so, I hope you’ll consider taking a survey from my friend and colleague Marissa Ahlering of The Nature Conservancy.  Marissa is trying to better understand the use of locally sourced seed in restoration work.  It’s a short survey (10-15 minutes) and your help would really help move the science of restoration forward.

Nelson Winkel, Platte River Prairies land steward, stands behind a pile of prairie seed. Most of our seed these days is harvested from our own prairies, but not everyone has the ability to harvest their own. Figuring out how to obtain seed that matches restoration objectives can be tricky.  (Ok, full disclosure, Nelson is actually KNEELING behind this pile to make it look bigger…)

Participation from anyone involved in grassland restoration, from policy makers to on-the-ground practitioners, would be helpful. You can read more about the survey and enter your responses by following THIS LINK.

Please forward this to any colleagues it might apply to.  Thanks for your help!

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About Chris Helzer

Chris Helzer is the Director of Science for The Nature Conservancy in Nebraska. His main role is to evaluate and capture lessons from the Conservancy’s land management and restoration work and then share those lessons with other landowners – both private and public. In addition, Chris works to raise awareness about the importance of prairies and their conservation through his writing, photography, and presentations to various groups. Chris is also the author of "The Ecology and Management of Prairies in the Central United States", published by the University of Iowa Press. He lives in Aurora, Nebraska with his wife Kim and their children.
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3 Responses to A Seedy Survey

  1. Joanne says:

    I wish I was involved — for those who are — thank you for your work, you have a great and important job.

  2. Kathy Olson says:

    I agree with Joanne. Thank you for restoration work. It is truly a labor (lots of labor) of love!

  3. Interesting and exciting restoration work. My first thought when I saw the photo above was that scene in Jurassic Park where they were trying to determine what was making the Triceratops sick

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