Photo of the Week – February 1, 2018

Earlier this week, Alex (one of our new Hubbard Fellows) and I spent some time exploring a frozen wetland in our Platte River Prairies.  Thin clouds diffused the sun’s rays and created wonderful light for photography.  The wetland was mostly iced over, but there were a few areas of open water (we flushed a few dozen geese and ducks as we arrived), and we had to step carefully and listen for cracking sounds as we walked…

In some places, leaves and stems warmed by the sun had melted the ice around them, creating fascinating patterns and textures in the ice.  Cattail seeds blew softly in the breeze, and a few perched gracefully where they had landed on the ice.  Intriguing branching patterns of crystallization were also scattered about on the surface of the frozen wetland.  About an hour after we arrived, the bright light dimmed as the clouds above us thickened.  We took our cue and moved on to other places and tasks.

This entry was posted in Prairie Photography and tagged , , , by Chris Helzer. Bookmark the permalink.

About Chris Helzer

Chris Helzer is the Director of Science for The Nature Conservancy in Nebraska. His main role is to evaluate and capture lessons from the Conservancy’s land management and restoration work and then share those lessons with other landowners – both private and public. In addition, Chris works to raise awareness about the importance of prairies and their conservation through his writing, photography, and presentations to various groups. Chris is also the author of "The Ecology and Management of Prairies in the Central United States", published by the University of Iowa Press. He lives in Aurora, Nebraska with his wife Kim and their children.

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