Photo of the Week – July 21, 2016

Lately, I’ve had some great opportunities to photograph big charismatic animals like bison and cute mammals like prairie dogs.  During the same period, however, I’ve also managed to make the kind of photographs I’m most drawn to – images of little things like flowers and bugs.  Since  much of what I’ve posted lately (the dung beetles post notwithstanding) has been bigger wildlife, I decided to share a selection of more close-up views of prairies today.

Black-eyed Susan from beneath. The Nature Conservancy's Platte River Prairies, Nebraska.

Black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta) from beneath. The Nature Conservancy’s Platte River Prairies, Nebraska.

Prairie cicada at The Nature Conservancy's Niobrara Valley Preserve, Nebraska.

Prairie cicada at The Nature Conservancy’s Niobrara Valley Preserve, Nebraska.

Prairie wild rose (Rosa arkansana) at the Niobrara Valley Preserve.

Prairie wild rose (Rosa arkansana) at the Niobrara Valley Preserve.

Katydid nymph on upright prairie coneflower. Platte River Prairies.

Katydid nymph on upright prairie coneflower. Platte River Prairies.

Side-oats grama (Bouteloua curtipendula). Platte River Prairies, Nebraska.

Side-oats grama (Bouteloua curtipendula). Platte River Prairies, Nebraska.

Broad sweeping vistas and big stompy animals add drama to prairie landscapes, but most of the complexity and function actually happens at a very small scale.  Sometimes it’s nice to just pause and enjoy the little things.

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About Chris Helzer

Chris Helzer is the Director of Science for The Nature Conservancy in Nebraska. His main role is to evaluate and capture lessons from the Conservancy’s land management and restoration work and then share those lessons with other landowners – both private and public. In addition, Chris works to raise awareness about the importance of prairies and their conservation through his writing, photography, and presentations to various groups. Chris is also the author of "The Ecology and Management of Prairies in the Central United States", published by the University of Iowa Press. He lives in Aurora, Nebraska with his wife Kim and their children.
This entry was posted in Prairie Insects, Prairie Natural History, Prairie Photography, Prairie Plants and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Photo of the Week – July 21, 2016

  1. Yes! I like the nymph photo especially. Don’t think I’ve ever seen one of those IRL. When I first got a camera, playing with the macro setting was the most fun, because it revealed things you cannot see well with a naked eye. I am really enjoying learning more about prairies through your blog!

  2. Love these! Thank you!

  3. Gary Dunsmoor says:

    Really enjoy the intricateness of the photos- thanks.

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