Quarantine Quiz #2

Hello again. Last week’s quiz seemed to get good reviews, so I thought I’d try another one. Don’t count on this being a weekly thing – we’ll see how it goes. I did notice that many people remarked that they did very well on the quiz, which tells me it was probably too easy. I’ll make this week’s a little trickier. Good luck! The answers are at the bottom of the page.

1) Which of these creatures is a true bug? (Choose all that apply)

.

2) One of the following is the common name of a moth, one is a mushroom, and one is a seashell. Label them correctly.

A. The Green Marvel

B. Cloud Ear

C. False Angel Wing

.

3) What happened in this photo?

A. A raccoon was grabbed by a swooping eagle but was heavy enough that the eagle ended up dragging it several times before finally getting into the air.

B. A river otter was sliding across snow-covered ice as it traveled (because otters are too cool to just walk like a normal animal).

C. A beaver was walking across the snow and let its tail drag behind it much of the time.

D. Chris’ kids were screwing around on the ice. No one got hurt.

.

4) Three of the following are official common names of moths. Which name did I make up?

A. Rose Hooktip

B. Black-blotched Schizura

C. Shady Dragon

D. The German Cousin

.

5) What is this beautiful Black and Yellow Garden Spider doing in this photo?

A. It just caught a beetle, wrapped it up and is preparing to suck the liquefied innards out of it (like any self-respecting spider does).

B. It is preparing a coccoon, in which it will transform into a beautiful moth.

C. It is protecting its eggs, which are encased inside that silken bag.

D. Wait, spiders can turn into moths??

E. This is a quiz. I can’t tell you that. You have to guess.

.

6) I made up another moth name. Which of these is not the official common name of a moth species?

A. Intrepid Burglar

B. Scurfy Quaker

C. Exhausted Brocade

D. Confused Woodgrain

.

7) Why isn’t this plant green?

A. It’s dead.

B. It turns green during the day when the sun is out but stores its chlorophyll below ground overnight to keep it safe. This is a photo from early morning.

C. It’s a parasitic plant so it doesn’t need chlorophyll.

D. It’s a teenaged plant (in plant years). All the plants around it are green so it decided to be pinkish-brown. It doesn’t need to conform to your societal expectations.

.

8) I can’t stop with the moth thing. The names are so incredibly wonderful. Which of these is NOT an official common name of a moth?

A. The Beggar

B. Welsh Wave

C. Snaky Arches

D. Fuzzy Zoeller

.

.

.

.

Answers:

  1. The answer is B. A and C are beetles and D is a tick (count the legs!). True bugs are those in the taxonomic order Hemiptera, which includes stinkbugs, cicadas, leafhoppers, and, in this case, boxelder bugs.
  2. In order, they are A. Moth, B. Mushroom, and C. Seashell
  3. This photos shows where an otter slide across the ice – repeatedly – as it traveled down a frozen stream/wetland. I’ve heard they do this as an energy saving trick, but those of us with extensive otter experience know they’re just doing it to show off.
  4. The one I made up is C, but you have to admit, ‘Shady Dragon’ would be a great moth name.
  5. No, spiders can’t transform into moths. Why would they want to? They’re SPIDERS. It’s hard to be cooler than that. The correct answer is C. This female spider was sitting with her egg case just below her spectacular web.
  6. The answer is A. If I ever get to name a moth, I think I’ll name it ‘Intrepid Burglar’.
  7. The answer is C. This is clustered broomrape (Orobanche fasciculata) and it is a parasitic plant, drawing nutrients from its neighbors. Thus, it doesn’t need to produce its own clorophyll.
  8. Fuzzy Zoeller is an American professional golfer, so D is the answer. As far as I know, he is not a moth, but I don’t really watch professional golf

This entry was posted in Uncategorized by Chris Helzer. Bookmark the permalink.

About Chris Helzer

Chris Helzer is the Director of Science for The Nature Conservancy in Nebraska. His main role is to evaluate and capture lessons from the Conservancy’s land management and restoration work and then share those lessons with other landowners – both private and public. In addition, Chris works to raise awareness about the importance of prairies and their conservation through his writing, photography, and presentations to various groups. Chris is also the author of "The Ecology and Management of Prairies in the Central United States", published by the University of Iowa Press. He lives in Aurora, Nebraska with his wife Kim and their children.

15 thoughts on “Quarantine Quiz #2

  1. I only got the otter question right – blame that on the fact I was distracted remembering the annoying box elder bugs.

  2. Hi Chris, Thanks so much for the inspiration and humor throughout the good and bad times. Chris Hull St. Louis MO.

    On Mon, Mar 23, 2020 at 3:27 PM The Prairie Ecologist wrote:

    > Chris Helzer posted: ” Hello again. Last week’s quiz seemed to get good > reviews, so I thought I’d try another one. Don’t count on this being a > weekly thing – we’ll see how it goes. I did notice that many people > remarked that they did very well on the quiz, which tells me it” >

  3. Loved this quiz!

    On Mon, Mar 23, 2020 at 3:28 PM The Prairie Ecologist wrote:

    > Chris Helzer posted: ” Hello again. Last week’s quiz seemed to get good > reviews, so I thought I’d try another one. Don’t count on this being a > weekly thing – we’ll see how it goes. I did notice that many people > remarked that they did very well on the quiz, which tells me it” >

  4. Thanks for another quiz. Love the moth questions!
    Regarding the tick photo, do you see any increase in ticks? I live in Ohio and spent most of my childhood tramping through woods and fields, seeing just a few. Now there seem to be ticks everywhere and I am finding them almost every time I’m outside. Do you feel that climate change has anything to do with the abundance of these little guys?

    • Sorry for the delay in answering this! I missed it somehow. I’m the wrong person to ask about ticks because they largely seem to ignore me, for some reason (as opposed to mosquitoes and chiggers, with both are attracted to me like magnets). Friends can walk through a prairie with me and come away with 20-30 ticks and I might have one on my pants, but none actually on me. Anyway, I haven’t heard anyone around here talking about seeing more ticks lately, but I’ll keep my antennae up for that now.

  5. 5/8. #2 all I got incorrect, #6 I thought D, but your vocab. is far better than mine. #8 I thought A and that you must have been referring to your dog who at the moment was begging! Thanks I had no idea of the moth names!

  6. 5/8. I had no idea about the common moth names. Clearly your imagination and vocab is better than mine, I figured #8 must have been A as your dog was begging for your attention while writing that question. I got all of #2 incorrect, as well as #6.

PLEASE COMMENT ON THIS POST!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.