Photos of the Week – July 19, 2020

Earlier this summer, we found a cluster of tiny praying mantis nymphs near our garage. Later, we found at least one empty egg case, from which we assumed the nymphs had emerged. I’m pretty sure the egg case was that of a Carolina mantis (native species) so I’m guessing the nymphs are of that species too, but I’m not 100% sure.

Regardless, the nymphs have grown since we first saw them, but are still only about an inch long. I’ve seen two of them this week, both on black-eyed Susan flowers in our prairie garden. The nymphs are too photogenic to ignore, so here is just a small sampling of the photos I’ve managed to get of these cute backyard residents.

This entry was posted in Uncategorized by Chris Helzer. Bookmark the permalink.

About Chris Helzer

Chris Helzer is the Director of Science for The Nature Conservancy in Nebraska. His main role is to evaluate and capture lessons from the Conservancy’s land management and restoration work and then share those lessons with other landowners – both private and public. In addition, Chris works to raise awareness about the importance of prairies and their conservation through his writing, photography, and presentations to various groups. Chris is also the author of "The Ecology and Management of Prairies in the Central United States", published by the University of Iowa Press. He lives in Aurora, Nebraska with his wife Kim and their children.

4 thoughts on “Photos of the Week – July 19, 2020

  1. I am always amazed at how much more people like a praying mantis than many other insects, which seems to revolve (slight pun intended) around its ability to turn its head. Anything that is a bit more human seems to get an automatic cuteness pass!
    😁✌️

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