Photos of the Week – December 16, 2021

I hope everyone is safe and well today, especially those of you who have been dealing with tornadoes and other high winds over the last several days.

Since I haven’t been out shooting much recently, I’ve been going back through piles of images from earlier this year. Today’s post groups together some of my favorites from the first several months of 2021. Some, but not all have appeared here before. So, sit back and enjoy a quick trip into the past…

(blah blah blah – here are some pictures to look at):

Snow in the Platte River Prairies. February 1, 2021. Tokina 11-20mm lens @11mm. ISO 250, f/22, 1/400 sec.
Snow and frost on the river at The Nature Conservancy’s Platte River Prairies. February 2, 2021. DJI Mavic 2 Zoom.
Prairie grass and snow at Lincoln Creek Prairie, Aurora, Nebraska. February 7, 2021. Nikon 105mm macro lens. ISO 250, f/22, 1/80 sec.
Frosty dogbane seed at Springer Waterfowl Production Area. February 9, 2021. Nikon 105mm macro lens. ISO 250, f/14, 1/320 sec.
Festive tiger beetle at the Platte River Prairies. March 9, 2021. Nikon 105mm macro lens. ISO 500, f/16, 1/250 sec.
Prairie dandelion at Gjerloff Prairie. April 17, 2021. Nikon 10.5mm fisheye lens. ISO 400, f/20, 1/125 sec.
Pasque flower at the Niobrara Valley Preserve. April 28, 2021. Nikon 105mm macro lens. ISO 320, f/8, 1/1600 sec.
Bison calf and cow at the Niobrara Valley Preserve. April 29, 2021. Nikon 18-300mm lens @300mm. ISO 320, f/6.3, 1/1600 sec.
Clouds at the Helzer family prairie. May 5, 2021. Tokina 11-20mm lens @11mm. ISO320, f/22, 1/160 sec.
Chokecherry blossoms at the Helzer family prairie. May 5, 2021. Nikon 105mm macro lens. ISO 320, f/13, 1/1000 sec.
Missouri evening primrose at the Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve in Kansas. May 28, 2021. Nikon 10.5mm fisheye lens. ISO 320, f/16, 1/160 sec.
Cobaea penstemon at the Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve in Kansas. May 28, 2021. Nikon 105mm macro lens. ISO 320, f/8, 1/1000 sec.
Orchard spider and web. Elk River Trail, Kansas. May 29, 2021. Nikon 105mm macro lens. ISO 400, f/8, 1/80 sec.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized by Chris Helzer. Bookmark the permalink.

About Chris Helzer

Chris Helzer is the Director of Science for The Nature Conservancy in Nebraska. His main role is to evaluate and capture lessons from the Conservancy’s land management and restoration work and then share those lessons with other landowners – both private and public. In addition, Chris works to raise awareness about the importance of prairies and their conservation through his writing, photography, and presentations to various groups. Chris is also the author of "The Ecology and Management of Prairies in the Central United States", published by the University of Iowa Press. He lives in Aurora, Nebraska with his wife Kim and their children.

15 thoughts on “Photos of the Week – December 16, 2021

  1. Chris: I am wondering if we could use some of your amazing photos for our newsletter for the Wild Ones Front Range Chapter. As you know, we are the local Colorado chapter of a national org. promoting the use of native plants. I can send you a sample of our newsletter if you’d like, or you can look at them all on our website, frontrangewildones.org.

    If yes, just let me know how you would like the photo attribution to read. Thanks so much

    Deborah Lebow Aal, Board Member Wild Ones Front Range chapter

    On Thu, Dec 16, 2021 at 6:23 AM The Prairie Ecologist wrote:

    > Chris Helzer posted: ” I hope everyone is safe and well today, especially > those of you who have been dealing with tornadoes and other high winds over > the last several days. Since I haven’t been out shooting much recently, > I’ve been going back through piles of images from ” >

  2. Nice photos. I like the snow/ice scenes and the bison calf photos best. Your photos always seem so sharp. I look forward to seeing them and the bits of info you offer with them. Cheers.

  3. Pingback: Photos of the Week – December 16, 2021 — The Prairie Ecologist – ° BLOG ° Gabriele Romano

  4. Thank you for continuing to share your fabulous photos. I look forward to seeing them and reading your blog regularly. I hope you have a safe and happy Holiday Season with your family.

  5. Thanks for the chronological sequence to remind me, here at the beginning of winter, of what is in store as the days get longer and warmer. Pictures are so good. How do you get them so sharp? Your camera?

    • Thanks Glenn. The camera matters, though mine is a fairly old and cheap DSLR camera that I bought used. (Nikon D7100). Working with good lenses matters more, both for light and sharpness. I also use a tripod most of the time, which helps reduce camera shake. The most important answer, though, is that I’m only showing you the sharp ones!

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