Photo of the Week – December 11, 2014

For no particular reason, here are two unrelated photos from the same day.  Both photographs were taken on September 28, 2014 at our family prairie south of Aurora, Nebraska.  I wish I could come up with a pithy and informative way to link the two together, or to a larger theme or lesson.  I can’t.  I just like the photos.  I hope you do too.

A katydid on stiff goldenrod.  Frequent readers of The Prairie Ecologist will remember that you can distinguish a katydid from a grasshopper by its very long antenna.

A katydid on stiff goldenrod. Frequent readers of The Prairie Ecologist will remember that you can distinguish a katydid from a grasshopper by its very long antenna.

 

Stiff goldenrod seeds resting on the leaf beneath the seedhead they dropped from.

Stiff goldenrod seeds resting on the leaf beneath the seedhead from which they dropped.

 

This entry was posted in Prairie Insects, Prairie Photography, Prairie Plants and tagged , , , , , , , , , by Chris Helzer. Bookmark the permalink.

About Chris Helzer

Chris Helzer is the Director of Science for The Nature Conservancy in Nebraska. His main role is to evaluate and capture lessons from the Conservancy’s land management and restoration work and then share those lessons with other landowners – both private and public. In addition, Chris works to raise awareness about the importance of prairies and their conservation through his writing, photography, and presentations to various groups. Chris is also the author of "The Ecology and Management of Prairies in the Central United States", published by the University of Iowa Press. He lives in Aurora, Nebraska with his wife Kim and their children.

10 thoughts on “Photo of the Week – December 11, 2014

  1. Is there a possibility that the katydid drops some of the seeds it is eating, thereby facilitating another distribution route? That would be a link. In any case, just gorgeous!

  2. I would say common elements would include the colors (palette of greens and tans) and the emphasis on the strong diagonal lines (grasshopper antennae and legs; goldenrod stem and the hairs (what is the proper term?) on the seed)…even though both are at rest, because of the diagonal lines there is a sense of motion at the same time

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