Photo of the Week – June 29, 2018

We spent a productive week at the Niobrara Valley Preserve this week, collecting a mountain of data.  Five of us spent our days scrambling across the Sandhills, counting flowering plants, quantifying milkweed populations, and estimating habitat cover.  As always, we got to observe far more than what we were focusing on for science.  We saw bald eagles, box turtles, a couple different snakes, pronghorn, mice, bird nests, families of northern bobwhites and sharp-tailed grouse, countless kinds of invertebrates, and much more.  It was an exhausting, but fulfilling week.

The science crew for this week. From left to right: Alex Brechbill and Olivia Schouten (Hubbard Fellows), Amanda Hefner (Conservation Assistant at NVP), and Katharine Hogan (former Hubbard Fellow and current PhD student at the U of Nebraska-Lincoln).

The above photo shows the kind of energy our crew had, though it was also taken just as the week was starting.  Hot sun, wet grass, and lots of massive poison ivy patches eventually knocked their enthusiasm down a notch or two, but we all still had a great time.  The crew certainly made me feel twice their age (which I am, for at least one of them), and not just because I’m still a little hobbled by my recovering ankle.  I appreciated their patience as they waited for me at the end of each sampling grid.

After each day of data collection, I spent the bulk of my evening time trying to build up an inventory of aerial photos and video with our drone.  I flew over the river, across open grasslands and prairie dog towns, and among herds of bison.  My post from earlier this week showed a small slice of just one evening’s imagery.  It’ll probably take me weeks or months to get through all the footage from the last several days, but I do have one tiny video clip to share with you today.

On Tuesday night, I  followed a small portion of our east bison herd around for a while.  I was skirting the edges of the herd with the drone, trying to get a feel for how close I could get before the bison started to react to the vehicle’s presence.  The bison were certainly aware of the drone, but while they edged away when I got too close, they certainly didn’t act frightened or panicked.  A few hundred yards from the main group, a lone bison bull was grazing by himself.  I decided to test its patience a little (in the name of science, of course).  I flew the drone to within 15-20 yards or so of it, and lowered it down to 10 or 12 feet off the ground.  Then I just hovered right there while it was eating.  (Well, the drone hovered there – I was very safely standing a couple hundred yards away, right next to my truck!)

As I watched through the screen on my controller, the bull glanced up a few times while it grazed, and then eventually raised its head to chew and watch the drone.  It chewed and watched for almost a minute.  Just as I was getting tired of the experiment and started to push the button to end the video, the bull’s patience apparently ran out.

Oh boy, do I wish I hadn’t hit the “stop recording” button when I did, but you get a pretty good picture of what came next.  I don’t know if it would have jumped high enough to hit the drone, but I do know that my suddenly sweaty hands pushed the “UP!!!” button on the controller as fast I could when that bull started its charge.  One of the reasons I’m sharing this video is that it’s a great reminder that while bison are incredible and beautiful creatures, they are also unpredictable and dangerous.  People die, or are seriously injured, every year on public lands when they ignore the unpredictable and dangerous part of the equation, and try to get too close to these huge animals.  Bison aren’t going to chase you down and trample you to death for no reason, but if you invade their comfort zone, they are very capable of defending themselves.

This photo was taken just a few minutes after the video.  I was safely in my truck…

As soon as I flew the drone away, the bison returned to calmly grazing, probably congratulating itself on how easily it had scared away that odd-looking, noisy, and pesky bird.  After watching the bull for a while from a distance, I drove slowly closer to it and photographed it as it continued grazing.  It was well aware of my presence, but is used to being around pickup trucks.  Since I wasn’t coming AT him, he calmly grazed and wandered on his way.

I’m fully aware of how fortunate I am to have my job, and to have access to the places we own and conserve. I’m incredibly grateful for everyone who reads this blog, but even more to people whose financial support allows our conservation work to happen.  I wish I could give each of you a personalized tour of our sites, but in lieu of that, I’ll continue trying to do the next best thing – show you the diversity and beauty of those places as best I can through writing and photography.  You can also come visit, of course, and hike the trails to see what you can see.  In the meantime, stay tuned for more photos and videos.

Information on visiting the Niobrara Valley Preserve can be found here and on visiting the Platte River Prairies here.

A Family Roundup

During the 20 years of my employment with The Nature Conservancy in Nebraska, I’ve been involved in at least 20 bison roundups (we usually do two a year – one for each herd at our Niobrara Valley Preserve).  Last week’s was my favorite, hands down.  It wasn’t because the roundup went well – though it went as smoothly as any we’ve done.  It wasn’t even because the weather was perfect – though it was.  Nope, it was my favorite because it was the first time it’s ever worked out to bring my kids along.

My son John, laughing with other workers at this year's roundup of the west bison herd at The Niobrara Valley Preserve.
My son John, laughing with other workers at this year’s roundup of the west bison herd at The Niobrara Valley Preserve.

I didn’t get to bring all of them, but everything lined up just right for John and Daniel, who were on fall break from school and were old enough to be helpful and safe.  They had a great time, and the experience was far richer for me as well.

Now, to be perfectly clear, we don’t typically involve kids in our roundups, but I was able to supervise the boys personally and make sure they were safely doing work appropriate to their age and ability.  To begin with, both of them just watched the process to learn how the animals are moved quickly through a series of alleys and gates with as little noise and stress as possible.  Later in the day, they were both able to join in the work.

Daniel spend most of the morning doing "quality control" - helping the recorder keep track of how many animals of each sex and age came through the alleys.
Daniel spend most of the morning doing “quality control” – helping the recorder keep track of how many animals of each sex and age came through the alleys.
Later, Daniel learned how to use a flag to get the bison to move in the desired direction.
Later, Daniel learned how to use a flag to get the bison to move in the desired direction.
Unfortunately, the flag wasn't effective at warding off his dad/photographer.
Unfortunately, the flag wasn’t effective at warding off his dad/photographer.
Like a well-oiled machine, gates were opened and closed to sort animals as they moved through the alleys.
Like a well-oiled machine, gates were opened and closed to sort animals as they moved through the alleys.
Like Daniel, John started as an observer, marveling at the size, strength, and agility of the bison passing by.
Like Daniel, John started as an observer, marveling at the size, strength, and agility of the bison passing by.  Before long, however, he took over a sliding gate.
John seemed to enjoy the experience...
He seemed to enjoy the experience…
Most of the bison were difficult to distinguish from each other, but a few had unique characteristics, including one with a particularly long mop of hair and this one with its kerwhacky horns.
Most of the bison were difficult to distinguish from each other, but a few had unique characteristics, including one with a particularly long mop of hair and this one with its kerwhacky horns.
This was also the first bison roundup for our two Hubbard Fellows, Katharine (middle) and Eric (right).
This was also the first bison roundup for our two Hubbard Fellows, Katharine (middle) and Eric (right).
Katharine did two jobs much of the day, running a gate and also recording the sex and age of the animals as they came through.
Katharine did two jobs much of the day, running a gate and also recording the sex and age of the animals as they came through.
Eric hides behind a gate while bison move past.
Here, Eric is hiding behind a gate while bison move past.
Then he gets to show off his athleticism as he hurdles the fence and closes the gate behind the bison.
Then he shows off his athleticism as he hurdles the fence and closes the gate behind the bison.
After the work settled down, the boys and I took a quick trip to a nearby prairie dog town, where they (fruitlessly) waited for the prairie dogs to come back out of their holes.
After the work settled down, the boys and I took a quick trip to a nearby prairie dog town.  They learned that no matter how long you wait, prairie dogs don’t re-emerge from holes while you’re sitting there.
The roundup was a success because of the help of many staff and volunteers, including Richard Egelhoff (cowboy hat), who recently retired from being our bison manager.
The roundup was a success because of the help of many staff and volunteers, including Richard Egelhoff (cowboy hat), who recently retired from being our bison manager.

Photo of the Week – October 29, 2015

As I mentioned in my last two posts, I was up at the Niobrara Valley Preserve last week, helping with a bison roundup.  As I mentioned in my last post, I helped with the roundup, but I also took photos – both of people and bison (and leaves, and crickets, and…).  I shared one of the bison photos last week.  Here are a few more shots of these beautiful animals.

Bison roundup at TNC Niobrara Valley Preserve. Nebraska.
A bison cow looks into the camera.  The Nature Conservancy’s Niobrara Valley Preserve, Nebraska

The sky was overcast all day, but now and then the sky brightened enough to make “portrait” photography work.  As long as I kept still while standing outside the pens, the bison didn’t seem overly bothered by my presence.

Bison roundup at TNC Niobrara Valley Preserve. Nebraska.
A young-of-the-year calf.

Getting up close to these animals is a great reminder of their athletic abilities.  For the most part, the animals are relatively calm as they move through the pens and alleyways, but now and then there is a flurry of activity.  A bison will spin on a dime and head in the other direction much faster than you’d expect.  One animal will shove another out of its path, showing off the incredible strength in its neck and upper body.  It’s never a good idea to underestimate these animals.

Bison roundup at TNC Niobrara Valley Preserve. Nebraska.
This shaggy old bull barely fit through the final alleyway.  We made sure to make his passage as quick as possible, and he went through without incident.
Bison roundup at TNC Niobrara Valley Preserve. Nebraska.
A closer look at the same big bull.

Design of bison corrals is continually improving.  Construction of a new corral for our east herd (these photos are from the west herd) is just wrapping up.  It incorporates the most up-to-date design components available, including lessons learned from other bison herds around the country and from experts like Temple Grandin.  Each improvement is aimed at decreasing stress on the animals and increasing the speed and efficiency of the whole operation.  I’m excited to see the new corral in operation when we test it out early next year.

Bison Good, Cattle Bad??

Among some prairie enthusiasts, there seems to be a perception that plains bison are magical creatures that live in complete harmony with the prairie.  They eat grasses but not wildflowers, they float just above the ground to avoid stepping on plants or compacting the soil, and they create tidy little wallows that fill with rainwater for tadpoles and wading birds.  Cattle, on the other hand, are evil creatures that seek and destroy wildflowers, removing them from prairies forever.  They also stomp all over prairies, trampling plants and birds to death and causing cascades of soil erosion and water pollution.

Seriously?

These particular magical animals are at The Nature Conservancy's Broken Kettle Grasslands in northwest Iowa.
These particular magical animals are at The Nature Conservancy’s Broken Kettle Grasslands in northwest Iowa.

Let me be clear: I’m a big fan of bison.  I feel very fortunate to spend time at The Nature Conservancy’s Niobrara Valley Preserve and other big prairies where I can observe and photograph bison up close.  Bison are distinctive, attractive animals that evoke a sense of history and grandeur… but they are also big stompy animals that go wherever they want, poop all over the place, rub on trees, trample plants (and animals), and can cause erosion issues.  None of that is good or bad; it just is.

I’m a fan of cattle too.  They have big beautiful eyes, individual personalities, and can be more playful than their typically stoic faces might hint at.  I enjoy spending time around cattle at our Platte River Prairies and in my own family prairie.  In both places, they are a major part of our prairie management strategy, which is aimed at creating and maintaining diverse plant communities and high quality wildlife habitat.  (And yes, cattle are also big stompy animals that go wherever they want, poop all over, rub on trees, trample plants and animals, and cause erosion issues.)

 

TREES AND PONDS

While both bison and cattle can be engaging creatures, there are a few real differences between the way bison and cattle utilize and impact prairies.  However, those differences are less stark than you might think.  Based on the best available research and expert knowledge, the biggest distinction between bison and cattle behavior in prairies essentially boils down to this: cattle hang around water and trees more than bison do.

That general pattern is reported in many studies comparing the two, but was most reliably demonstrated in a recent study at The Nature Conservancy’s Tallgrass Prairie Preserve in Oklahoma, where GPS collars tracked animal locations through time.  That study looked at bison and cattle at similar stocking rates and under the same management regime (patch-burn grazing) – though the bison were grazing year-round in a 23,000 acre pasture while cattle were only present for 7 months/year in pastures of around 1000-2000 acres.  The GPS collars showed that cattle were attracted to ponds and trees while bison tended to avoid areas near water and showed no attraction to trees.  Importantly, the same study also showed strong similarities between bison and cattle behavior, namely that both were strongly attracted to the most recently burned areas of pastures and tended to avoid steep slopes.

The conclusion that cattle are attracted to water and shade fits with one of the big objections to cattle grazing by some prairie enthusiasts – that cattle tend to “wreck” areas near ponds and tree groves by repeatedly stomping around and defecating in those places.  While that can be true, those impacts are highest under high stocking rates, and can be avoided by fencing out ponds and trees or greatly reduced by providing long rest periods between grazing bouts.  Those impacts are also less severe in larger pastures, especially when multiple water and shade options are available and cattle are encouraged (or forced) to use each area intermittently.  The attraction of cattle to wet and shaded areas can be a real challenge, but it’s not an insurmountable one.

These cattle almost look ashamed of their tendency to hang around in water.
These cattle almost look ashamed of their tendency to hang around in water.  In this case, however, we were actually encouraging it as a way to help us control invasive cattails.  We pulled the cattle out the next season and this little spot was a great shorebird area, with mud flats with scattered sedges and rushes.

DIET

The other beef prairie enthusiasts have with cattle (sorry) has to do with their diet.  The perception of many is that bison subsist solely on grass, leaving wildflowers untouched, while cattle eat a high percentage of forbs (broad-leaved plants), often leading to the decline of those species over time.  The purported result is that bison-grazed prairies maintain high plant diversity, including an abundance of rare plant species, while cattle-grazed prairies become degraded as numerous forb species are grazed out of existence.  While that’s a big overgeneralization, it’s an understandable one because a number of research projects have reached that conclusion.

Unfortunately, those research projects have largely compared bison and cattle under very different circumstances.  Diet comparisons are usually made between bison in a single huge pasture (often under patch-burn grazing management) and cattle in a rotational grazing system – often at a higher stocking rate.  As a result, it’s not clear whether observed differences between bison and cattle diets are due to biological differences or grazing systems.

Imagine if you were given 30 days’ worth of groceries at the beginning of each month. You’d likely eat many of your favorite foods first and then make do with whatever’s left toward the end of the month. Comparing your diet to that of someone who was allowed to go grocery shopping every day would be completely unfair, wouldn’t it?  Unfortunately, that’s essentially the comparison made by many research projects comparing the diets of cattle and bison.  Cattle in a rotational grazing system can only choose from the available plants in their particular paddock, and don’t get a new set of choices until they are moved into a new paddock.  In contrast, cattle or bison that spend their whole season in a large pasture, especially one in which a portion has been recently burned, can regulate their diet much more freely.  They spend most of their time eating their favorite foods (mostly grasses) in the most recently burned patch, but they can also travel elsewhere if the supply in that patch runs low.  In addition, by regrazing their favorite plants over and over, livestock can keep them in a state of high nutritional value for much of the season.

We did some research back in 2001 in which we evaluated the forage choices of cattle in a patch-burn grazing system under a moderate stocking rate (Helzer and Steuter 2005).  Our data showed that those cattle were very selective toward grasses, and ate very few forbs under those conditions.  That research, along with observations other scientists and cattle managers at patch-burn grazed sites, has led to an altered perception of the forage selection differences between cattle and bison – namely, that many of the differences are driven more by grazing system than by biology.

This photo shows the kind of selective grazing cattle can do in a patch-burn grazing system with a moderate stocking rate.  Ungrazed forbs in this photo include purple prairie clover and stiff sunflower, among many others.
This photo shows the kind of selective grazing cattle can do in a patch-burn grazing system with a moderate stocking rate. Ungrazed forbs in this photo include purple prairie clover, Illinois bundleflower and stiff sunflower – among many others.  We like the impacts of this kind of grazing on both plant diversity and insect/wildlife habitat.

CHOICES

Prairie managers have to make difficult decisions about how to create and maintain diverse plant and animal communities at their sites.  One big choice is whether to graze or not to graze a particular prairie.  Regardless of whether it is grazed by bison or cattle, a grazed prairie is going to look and act very differently than an ungrazed prairie.  Many plants will be stepped on and eaten.  Some portions of the prairie will be more heavily visited than others and will get trampled down.  Short-lived opportunistic plants will become more abundant, due to the weakening of dominant grasses through repeated grazing.  Some managers will see those effects as positive, but others will not – depending upon the management needs of a particular prairie.  Regardless, deciding whether or not to graze has far greater consequences than the subsequent decision about whether to graze with bison or cattle.

If the decision to graze has been made, it’s important to recognize the appropriate criteria for deciding between bison and cattle.  Bison do act somewhat differently than cattle, especially around water and trees.  However, those differences depend heavily on scale.  Both cattle and bison create areas of bare soil around drinking water sources, and both create trails as they move from one favorite place to another.  In small pastures, those impacts are multiplied because both bison and cattle are forced to visit the same places repeatedly, which can lead to repeated trampling of plants, soil compaction, and other issues.  The differences between a small bison-grazed pasture and a small cattle-grazed pasture are pretty minimal.

In larger pastures (thousands of acres in size), grazing animals have room to spread out.  At that scale, bison-grazed pastures tend to have fewer heavily grazed and trampled areas near trees and standing water than cattle pastures do.  While that can certainly be a perk of using bison, it’s also important to remember that even in large cattle-grazed pastures, the proportion of the overall pasture that receives that kind of heavy impact is very small.  In addition, there are management options that can be used to minimize the size and severity of those impacts by cattle.  Those include fenced exclosures around sensitive areas and tactics that shift the locations where cattle spend most of their time (such as creating new burned patches, turning on/off drinking water facilities, and moving mineral feeders around).  The upshot is that there can be some prairie conservation benefits of using bison.  However, those benefits accrue most strongly in very large pastures, and even at that scale, there are cattle management strategies that can close that gap considerably.  On the flip side, bison come with their own set of complications and costs.

These bison are grazing in a 10,000 acre pasture at The Nature Conservancy's Niobrara Valley Preserve in Nebraska.
Bison at The Nature Conservancy’s Niobrara Valley Preserve in Nebraska.  These animals are in a 10,000 acre pasture where they have plenty of room to roam.

I spend most of my time working at our Platte River Prairies, and I’m often asked why we don’t have bison at those sites.  There are several good reasons for that, starting with management flexibility.  The cattle that graze our Platte River Prairies belong to our neighbors, and our lease arrangements allow us to dictate how many, where, and for how long cattle graze each year.  Between years, or even within years, we can pretty easily change those plans if we get unexpected weather patterns or just don’t like the way things look.  That kind of adaptive management is much more difficult with bison, especially because if we had bison, we’d have to own the herd and keep them on our prairies year round.

A second reason we use cattle is financial.  It takes a much lower investment in infrastructure and personnel to lease cattle than to own bison.  We have to provide a good perimeter fence (usually a four-wire barbed wire fence) to hold cattle in our pasture, and provide water for them to drink.  Beyond that, the owner of the cattle trucks them in when we ask for them, and then gathers and trucks them away again when we’re done.  If we owned a bison herd, we would need a much stouter, and more expensive fence, and a very expensive corral system to use for an annual roundup, sorting, and inoculation process.  In addition, we would be responsible for conducting that roundup, doctoring animals when if needed, and for dealing with buying/selling animals to maintain our desired herd size.  All of that takes time and people, and that’s expensive.  At our Niobrara Valley Preserve, the 22,000 acres of bison pasture can hold enough bison that income from selling excess animals covers many of those costs. That wouldn’t pencil out in our much smaller prairies down on the Platte River.

Conservancy employee Doug Kuhre runs the hydraulic-operated gates at a bison sorting corral at the Niobrara Valley Preserve.
Conservancy employee Doug Kuhre runs the hydraulic-operated gates at a bison sorting corral during an annual roundup at the Niobrara Valley Preserve.

The last reason we run cattle instead of bison is that in our relatively small prairies (200-600 acres), the behavior of bison would not be very different than that of cattle.  We might see less stomping around in standing water and under trees, but we can already manage those impacts by controlling whether/how often cattle have access to those areas.  Most importantly, through our use of patch-burn grazing, electric fence enclosures and exclosures, and our ability to set and change grazing intensity, timing, and frequency, we are getting the prairie management impacts we want by using cattle.  We can get cattle to graze very selectively in order to suppress grasses and give wildflowers a chance to flourish, and to create the kind of patchy habitat structure many wildlife and insect species need to thrive.  In other cases, we can get them to graze much less selectively in order to create a particular habitat structure or other impact.  As a result, we are maintaining resilient and diverse prairies – and that is our ultimate goal.

Cattle aren't so bad when you get to know them...  More importantly, they can serve as very effective tools for prairie conservation... even if they don't look exactly like bison.
Cattle aren’t so bad when you get to know them… More importantly, they can serve as very effective tools for prairie conservation… even if they don’t look exactly like bison.

CONCLUSION

Plains bison nearly disappeared completely from the grasslands of North America as European settlement spread across the continent.  The ongoing recovery of bison is an important indicator of prairie conservation success, and I hope that upward trend continues.  At the same time, I worry about the tendency of some to heap accolades upon bison while dismissing cattle as inherently destructive.  The differences between them simply don’t warrant that kind of broad categorization.  If grassland conservation is our goal, we should be sure we’re open to using whatever strategies (or animals) can help achieve that.  In very large prairies, bison may be the best fit – assuming the logistics and costs of owning bison make sense.  In other situations, however, deciding whether bison or cattle are most appropriate is not a simple matter.  It’s a decision that should be based on facts and management objectives – not on aesthetics or mythology.

Photo of the Week – August 15, 2013

I took my two sons up to the Niobrara Valley Preserve earlier this week for one last outing before school started.  It was fun to see the Preserve through their eyes.  While I was looking at impacts from last year’s fire and grazing and noting ecological interactions between sunflowers and insects, the boys were chasing toads and just having fun bouncing along through the sandhills.

The big selling point to get the kids to tag along was the promise of seeing bison.  After driving around the 10,000 acre pasture for more than two hours without a bison sighting, I was getting a little nervous about keeping that promise.  Just as I was about to give up, the radio crackled and Richard (our bison manager) called to say he’d spotted bison at the opposite end of the pasture while he was working on something else.  About half an hour later, we found them and the trip was officially a success.

Here are a few photos from the two days:

My son John, standing at the welcome sign for the Preserve.
My son John, standing at the welcome sign for the Preserve.  Did I mention there were some sunflowers blooming in the sandhills this year?

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John spotted this turtle along the road into the Preserve, so we stopped to have a closer look.
John spotted this turtle along the road into the Preserve, so we stopped to have a closer look.

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Here's Daniel, standing among the weedy regrowth under the burned out pines north of the river.
Here’s Daniel, standing among the weedy regrowth under the burned out pines north of the river.

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The Niobrara river from a high vantage point.
The Niobrara river from a high vantage point.

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It was a relief when we finally popped over a hill and saw bison spread out below us.
It was a relief when we finally popped over a hill and saw bison spread out below us.

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Bison
The bison seemed sleek and healthy, clearly thriving in the abundant regrowth after last year’s wildfire.